Head On Photo Festival: Acholiland - portraits of resilience

Brian Hodges
   
November
   
12
 -  
November
   
23
"Today, ten years after the end of hostilities, the region appears rejuvenated -- a bustling trade and business centre with buildings shooting up and a renewed sense of optimism. A generation who grew up in refugee camps is receiving needed education, learning trades, and farming the land again."

INFORMATION

Conflict and violence have plagued much of Uganda since its independence in 1962. The most protracted of these conflicts, the insurgency against the Lord’s Resistance Army, lasted nearly 18 years. Nearly 2 million people were forcibly displaced and confined into settlements and tens of thousands were kidnapped, mutilated or killed. Conflict eventually ceased; In 2007 Lord’s Resistance Army retreated from northern Uganda.

 

Today, ten years after the end of hostilities, the region appears rejuvenated -- a bustling trade and business centre with buildings shooting up and a renewed sense of optimism. A generation who grew up in refugee camps is receiving needed education, learning trades, and farming the land again.

 

While many still carry the physical and emotional scars of unconscionable devastation, it is evident the human spirit is profoundly capable of emerging with resilience after war.

 

Artist Bio

Brian Hodges was born in Los Angeles, California in 1962. He earned a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Colorado, and a M.S. in Telecommunications Engineering from the École Nationale Supérieure des Télécommuniations in Paris, France.

 

Based out of Paris, Hodges worked over several years engineering satellite telecommunications systems. Collaborating with the director of the European Space Agency, he co-developed the initial working prototype of the commercially successful XM Satellite Radio system. After completing his master’s degree, Hodges started to practice photography alongside his career inengineering. This dual practice shaped his work method and artistic vision.

 

An internationally recognised photographer specialising in portraits and documentary photojournalism, Hodges portfolio spans the four corners of the globe; he has traveled to more than 60 countries creating award-winning images. Being both multilingual and multicultural, he brings with him unique view of cultural production and the role of the artist in society - views informed by his global experiences.

 

His photographs have been published in national and international books and magazines including Geo Magazine, National Geographic Traveller, Vogue, Elle Magazine, Marie Claire, Huffington Post, Conde Nast Traveler, and Wallpaper Magazine among others. His images from Mongolia, Indonesia, and Mexico have been included in the the book series Gypset (Assouline Publishing, 2012 - 2014), and his work has also been featured in exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad.

 

Keenly interested in the power of documentary photography to effect social change, he has worked since 2015 on an ongoing social-awareness campaign focused on post conflict recovery in Northern Uganda. His published images from this project have received positive critical acclaim and have been instrumental in helping aid organisations raise funds to support their projects in this region.

 

Hodges has received the PDN / National Geographic Traveler photography award and was recognised as one of the top ten documentary photographers in the 2018 Australian Photography Awards. He has also been a recipient of multiple International Photography Awards (IPA) from the Lucie Foundation.

Conflict and violence have plagued much of Uganda since its independence in 1962. The most protracted of these conflicts, the insurgency against the Lord’s Resistance Army, lasted nearly 18 years. Nearly 2 million people were forcibly displaced and confined into settlements and tens of thousands were kidnapped, mutilated or killed. Conflict eventually ceased; In 2007 Lord’s Resistance Army retreated from northern Uganda.

 

Today, ten years after the end of hostilities, the region appears rejuvenated -- a bustling trade and business centre with buildings shooting up and a renewed sense of optimism. A generation who grew up in refugee camps is receiving needed education, learning trades, and farming the land again.

 

While many still carry the physical and emotional scars of unconscionable devastation, it is evident the human spirit is profoundly capable of emerging with resilience after war.

 

Artist Bio

Brian Hodges was born in Los Angeles, California in 1962. He earned a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Colorado, and a M.S. in Telecommunications Engineering from the École Nationale Supérieure des Télécommuniations in Paris, France.

 

Based out of Paris, Hodges worked over several years engineering satellite telecommunications systems. Collaborating with the director of the European Space Agency, he co-developed the initial working prototype of the commercially successful XM Satellite Radio system. After completing his master’s degree, Hodges started to practice photography alongside his career inengineering. This dual practice shaped his work method and artistic vision.

 

An internationally recognised photographer specialising in portraits and documentary photojournalism, Hodges portfolio spans the four corners of the globe; he has traveled to more than 60 countries creating award-winning images. Being both multilingual and multicultural, he brings with him unique view of cultural production and the role of the artist in society - views informed by his global experiences.

 

His photographs have been published in national and international books and magazines including Geo Magazine, National Geographic Traveller, Vogue, Elle Magazine, Marie Claire, Huffington Post, Conde Nast Traveler, and Wallpaper Magazine among others. His images from Mongolia, Indonesia, and Mexico have been included in the the book series Gypset (Assouline Publishing, 2012 - 2014), and his work has also been featured in exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad.

 

Keenly interested in the power of documentary photography to effect social change, he has worked since 2015 on an ongoing social-awareness campaign focused on post conflict recovery in Northern Uganda. His published images from this project have received positive critical acclaim and have been instrumental in helping aid organisations raise funds to support their projects in this region.

 

Hodges has received the PDN / National Geographic Traveler photography award and was recognised as one of the top ten documentary photographers in the 2018 Australian Photography Awards. He has also been a recipient of multiple International Photography Awards (IPA) from the Lucie Foundation.

FEATURED WORKS

Brian Hodges, Untitled 1, Gulu, Northern Uganda, Pigment print on archival paper, 50 x 75 cm, Edition of 9 prints
Brian Hodges, Untitled 2, Gulu, Northern Uganda, Pigment print on archival paper, 50 x 75 cm, Edition of 9 prints
Brian Hodges, Untitled 3, Gulu, Northern Uganda, Pigment print on archival paper, 50 x 75 cm, Edition of 9 prints
Brian Hodges, Untitled 4, Gulu, Northern Uganda, Pigment print on archival paper, 50 x 75 cm, Edition of 9 prints
Brian Hodges, Untitled 5, Gulu, Northern Uganda, Pigment print on archival paper, 50 x 75 cm, Edition of 9 prints
Brian Hodges, Untitled 6, Gulu, Northern Uganda, Pigment print on archival paper, 50 x 75 cm, Edition of 9 prints

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS