Aura Nox Anima

Lux Eterna
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
March
   
31
 -  
April
   
11
Aura Nox Anima is an exhibition in two parts, taken from a body of work that parallels the imperceptibly slow passage of time and how life layers itself into death within these desolate environments. Envisioned in still imagery of desert found, cross sectioned rocks and in video of dancers’ long durational presence in the dunes.

INFORMATION

In both these juxtapositions, we are invited to start perceiving a slower passage of time, acknowledging our visceral vulnerabilities and the dense bio-materials, that may or may not mineralise in our memory, are on loan from the earth. Conglomerating residencies in the windblown and sand dusted topographies of Anna Bay, NSW and Erg Chebbi, Morocco, a fascination with death, her Bodyweather practice and collected bio-material/geo-material, all yield a timeless space for existential contemplation. Deliberating the simplicity of these sandy geographies, human figures surrendering to the design of the elements and minimally linear tracings of found minerals, rocks and fossils, Aura Nox Anima creates a space, gentle in holding truths about our mortality and serves to guide visitors to a possible level of comfort in acknowledging that an end is imminent.

A multidisciplinary artistic approach investigating the inter connectivity between transient yet infinitely occurring circular paths of life, death, regeneration and record keeping re-tracing and re-imaging geological and biological forms, elements, patterns in dance, photography, drawing, video, sound, which yield the acute detail of material construct of our universe and the atoms of nature. Further challenging current image and art making stereotypes of feminine/masculine by bringing it back to the experiential, the reflective and the emotive psyche.

Lux Eterna is a freelance fine and multi-disciplinary artist, commercial photographer and arts educator living, working and exhibiting in Sydney. Holding degrees in Arts, Filmmaking and Education, her original training consisted of classical music, photography and ceramics. Lux currently maintains a regular bodyweather practice, which somatically imprints the natural world and it’s patterns into her body and thus becoming the foundational platform from which she creates work.

Lux’s work investigates existing ideas concerning feminine/masculine image, geological forms and life/death cycles of organic matter and biomaterial and the passing of time. Having facilitated alongside Marina Abramović In Residence, for Kaldor Public Art Projects here in Sydney, which included training in Marina’s method, Lux’s exploration into and development of new works are opening up to include long durational performance, further expanding on her own meditative and performance art practice.

Lux Eterna’s upcoming exhibition and ongoing body of work goes deeper into the imperceptibly slow passage of time and how life layers itself into death within arid environments. Envisioned in the still imagery of desert found, cross sectioned rocks, desolate soundscapes and in video of dancers’ long durational presence in the dunes. All this catalysed from residencies granted in NSW and Morocco. This fascination with the ever imminent death, impermanence contrasted by found mineralised forms as historical insight into who we are, parallels the unknown,or more so, an ignored aspect of life, hence, the work sets out in inviting audiences to refine their sensitivities to feeling, within time-slow and desert like recreated contexts.

In both these juxtapositions, we are invited to start perceiving a slower passage of time, acknowledging our visceral vulnerabilities and the dense bio-materials, that may or may not mineralise in our memory, are on loan from the earth. Conglomerating residencies in the windblown and sand dusted topographies of Anna Bay, NSW and Erg Chebbi, Morocco, a fascination with death, her Bodyweather practice and collected bio-material/geo-material, all yield a timeless space for existential contemplation. Deliberating the simplicity of these sandy geographies, human figures surrendering to the design of the elements and minimally linear tracings of found minerals, rocks and fossils, Aura Nox Anima creates a space, gentle in holding truths about our mortality and serves to guide visitors to a possible level of comfort in acknowledging that an end is imminent.

A multidisciplinary artistic approach investigating the inter connectivity between transient yet infinitely occurring circular paths of life, death, regeneration and record keeping re-tracing and re-imaging geological and biological forms, elements, patterns in dance, photography, drawing, video, sound, which yield the acute detail of material construct of our universe and the atoms of nature. Further challenging current image and art making stereotypes of feminine/masculine by bringing it back to the experiential, the reflective and the emotive psyche.

Lux Eterna is a freelance fine and multi-disciplinary artist, commercial photographer and arts educator living, working and exhibiting in Sydney. Holding degrees in Arts, Filmmaking and Education, her original training consisted of classical music, photography and ceramics. Lux currently maintains a regular bodyweather practice, which somatically imprints the natural world and it’s patterns into her body and thus becoming the foundational platform from which she creates work.

Lux’s work investigates existing ideas concerning feminine/masculine image, geological forms and life/death cycles of organic matter and biomaterial and the passing of time. Having facilitated alongside Marina Abramović In Residence, for Kaldor Public Art Projects here in Sydney, which included training in Marina’s method, Lux’s exploration into and development of new works are opening up to include long durational performance, further expanding on her own meditative and performance art practice.

Lux Eterna’s upcoming exhibition and ongoing body of work goes deeper into the imperceptibly slow passage of time and how life layers itself into death within arid environments. Envisioned in the still imagery of desert found, cross sectioned rocks, desolate soundscapes and in video of dancers’ long durational presence in the dunes. All this catalysed from residencies granted in NSW and Morocco. This fascination with the ever imminent death, impermanence contrasted by found mineralised forms as historical insight into who we are, parallels the unknown,or more so, an ignored aspect of life, hence, the work sets out in inviting audiences to refine their sensitivities to feeling, within time-slow and desert like recreated contexts.

FEATURED  WORKS

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