Beastliness

Deborah Kelly
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
March
   
2
 -  
March
   
13
Deborah Kelly is a Sydney-based artist whose works have been shown around Australia, and in the Singapore, Sydney, Thessaloniki and Venice Biennales. 2017 will see her first international solo exhibition, at the Kvindemuseet in Aarhus, Denmark.

INFORMATION

Deborah Kelly is a Sydney-based artist whose works have been shown around Australia, and in the Singapore, Sydney, Thessaloniki and Venice Biennales. 2017 will see her first international solo exhibition, at the Kvindemuseet in Aarhus, Denmark.

 

Her projects across media are concerned with lineages of representation, politics and history in public exchange.

Her work Tank Man Tango: a Tiananmen Memorial was included in Zero Tolerance at MOMA PS1, NYC, (Oct 2014–Apr 2015) touring to Basel Miami. Her MCA-commissioned work considering the rise of religiosity in the public sphere, Beware of the God, included videos in train stations, dossiers on politicians and projections onto clouds over Sydney Harbour.

Kelly's collage-based artworks have been shown in galleries and cinemas around Australia, in London, Mexico City, Cologne, Weimar, Leipzig, Moscow, St Petersburg, Seoul, Paris, Rio, Zagreb, Prague, Brno, Ljubljana, Hong Kong, Singapore, Vienna, Jakarta, Bandung and several US cities. She won an acquisition award at the 2016 Mornington National works on Paper Award, the 2015 Cayte Latta Award for Visual Arts, the 2013 Redlands Art Prize Audience Award, the 2012 Albury Art Prize, the 2009 Fisher’s Ghost Award, the 2009 Screengrab International New Media Art Award, and with boat-people.org, the 2004 WINK Award. Tank Man Tango was shortlisted for the Sadler’s Wells Global Dance Contest, and Hey, Hetero! won the 2001 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras visual art award.

'Beastliness' 2011 is an animated video made from photomontage works in which a fantastic bestiary of creatures and women dance and morph, becoming each other and consuming each other. Kelly re-mythologises the feminine into the hybrid creatures that have lurked within the human imagination over millennia and through doing so questions the assumptions and fears that have swirled around gender roles and rules in western culture. She does so through the hyper-contemporary visual language of digital media while also referring to early 20th century photo-montage pioneers such as Hannah Hoch and the Dada movement. In moving from the natural to the unnatural and the supernatural, Kelly makes the point that nothing may be what it seems and that how we view each other is always mediated through cultural and social conditioning.Statement courtesy of Art Gallery of NSW

Deborah Kelly is a Sydney-based artist whose works have been shown around Australia, and in the Singapore, Sydney, Thessaloniki and Venice Biennales. 2017 will see her first international solo exhibition, at the Kvindemuseet in Aarhus, Denmark.

 

Her projects across media are concerned with lineages of representation, politics and history in public exchange.

Her work Tank Man Tango: a Tiananmen Memorial was included in Zero Tolerance at MOMA PS1, NYC, (Oct 2014–Apr 2015) touring to Basel Miami. Her MCA-commissioned work considering the rise of religiosity in the public sphere, Beware of the God, included videos in train stations, dossiers on politicians and projections onto clouds over Sydney Harbour.

Kelly's collage-based artworks have been shown in galleries and cinemas around Australia, in London, Mexico City, Cologne, Weimar, Leipzig, Moscow, St Petersburg, Seoul, Paris, Rio, Zagreb, Prague, Brno, Ljubljana, Hong Kong, Singapore, Vienna, Jakarta, Bandung and several US cities. She won an acquisition award at the 2016 Mornington National works on Paper Award, the 2015 Cayte Latta Award for Visual Arts, the 2013 Redlands Art Prize Audience Award, the 2012 Albury Art Prize, the 2009 Fisher’s Ghost Award, the 2009 Screengrab International New Media Art Award, and with boat-people.org, the 2004 WINK Award. Tank Man Tango was shortlisted for the Sadler’s Wells Global Dance Contest, and Hey, Hetero! won the 2001 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras visual art award.

'Beastliness' 2011 is an animated video made from photomontage works in which a fantastic bestiary of creatures and women dance and morph, becoming each other and consuming each other. Kelly re-mythologises the feminine into the hybrid creatures that have lurked within the human imagination over millennia and through doing so questions the assumptions and fears that have swirled around gender roles and rules in western culture. She does so through the hyper-contemporary visual language of digital media while also referring to early 20th century photo-montage pioneers such as Hannah Hoch and the Dada movement. In moving from the natural to the unnatural and the supernatural, Kelly makes the point that nothing may be what it seems and that how we view each other is always mediated through cultural and social conditioning.Statement courtesy of Art Gallery of NSW

FEATURED  WORKS

Deborah Kelly, Beastliness, 2011
Animated by Chris Wilson and Christian Heinrich
Original score by the Brutal Poodles
Audio engineering by Steve Smart

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS