Beautiful Bodies

David Lindesay & Elise Stanley
   
January
   
7
 -  
January
   
18
David Lindesay and Elise Stanley present two bodies of work in conversation with one another. They speak to each artist’s perception and interaction with their own body, both inward and outward expressions of self. Each artist explores the varied and personal experience of touch, presenting its power and its consequence.

INFORMATION

Lindesay’s work is born from the rage of violation. The physicality of his work is emphasised by the corrupted and defaced surface of the Polaroid photographs, as well as the ripping and taring of the prints. Coupled with the physical touch in the substance of the work, and added to by the artists treatment of it, Lindesay creates an outward expression of aggression and hostile touch. In contrast to this, large scale, double sided, silk prints offer a space of respite for the viewer, obscuring the other works and moving as the viewer does, in a dance of cause and affect. This is the space in which the artist gazes both inward to the viewer and outward to surrounding works. These larger than life self-portraits flow and distort just as grief and rage do, connecting to the beauty that exists in the simplicity of a powerful emotion.

 

Stanley articulates the relationship between her mind and her body through layered and cropped representations of her fleshy, voluptuous figure. She views vulnerable aspects of herself as a strength, intrinsic to her identity, much like her femininity and autonomy. These notions are highlighted in a larger than life drawing, which depicts two layered representations of her head and torso. The first figure is autonomous, staring directly into the gallery space and challenging the gaze of the viewer, while the second figure averts her gaze. The two figures within the work are in opposition to one another, one passive, one assertive; ultimately emphasising the ways in which vulnerability and assertiveness are equal parts of Elise’s identity. This large work is accompanied by a series of small screen prints that depict closely cropped images of Stanley’s hands pushing into her expansive flesh. These small prints further juxtapose the dichotomous relationship between aspects of Elise’s identity that often seem at odds. By pulling apart her body and seaming it back together, with close attention paid to the intricate details of her flesh, Stanley dissects the extremely personal history she has with her body. As she puts back together the exposed, intimate parts of herself, Elise emphasises the tensions between her mind and body, operating in unison.

 

Artist Bios

 

David Lindesay is a film photographer and multimedia artist. He graduated with First Class Honours from the Australian National University School of Art & Design in 2018. Since leaving university, he has exhibited in Canberra, Melbourne and Sydney in several group and solo exhibitions. Lindesay works as an Installer at the National Gallery of Australia, as well as maintaining his professional and personal photographic practises. This personal work has lately explored ideas of self portraiture through the agency of touch, and more broadly, representations of the body as power and group identity.

 

Elise Stanley is a print-bases artist located in Canberra, Australia. Elise recently completed her Bachelor of Visual Arts (Honours) in Printmedia & Drawing at the Australian National University School of Art & Design. Stanley has exhibited nationally and locally and upon graduating was the recipient of multiple awards as part of the Emerging Artist Award Scheme. Within her practice, Stanley references her own fleshy, fat figure, across several drawing and printmaking techniques. By depicting honest projections of herself, both emotionally and physically, Elise describes her personal experiences of femininity, vulnerability and autonomy, particularly focusing on the ways they operate cohesively, rather than in opposition.

Lindesay’s work is born from the rage of violation. The physicality of his work is emphasised by the corrupted and defaced surface of the Polaroid photographs, as well as the ripping and taring of the prints. Coupled with the physical touch in the substance of the work, and added to by the artists treatment of it, Lindesay creates an outward expression of aggression and hostile touch. In contrast to this, large scale, double sided, silk prints offer a space of respite for the viewer, obscuring the other works and moving as the viewer does, in a dance of cause and affect. This is the space in which the artist gazes both inward to the viewer and outward to surrounding works. These larger than life self-portraits flow and distort just as grief and rage do, connecting to the beauty that exists in the simplicity of a powerful emotion.

 

Stanley articulates the relationship between her mind and her body through layered and cropped representations of her fleshy, voluptuous figure. She views vulnerable aspects of herself as a strength, intrinsic to her identity, much like her femininity and autonomy. These notions are highlighted in a larger than life drawing, which depicts two layered representations of her head and torso. The first figure is autonomous, staring directly into the gallery space and challenging the gaze of the viewer, while the second figure averts her gaze. The two figures within the work are in opposition to one another, one passive, one assertive; ultimately emphasising the ways in which vulnerability and assertiveness are equal parts of Elise’s identity. This large work is accompanied by a series of small screen prints that depict closely cropped images of Stanley’s hands pushing into her expansive flesh. These small prints further juxtapose the dichotomous relationship between aspects of Elise’s identity that often seem at odds. By pulling apart her body and seaming it back together, with close attention paid to the intricate details of her flesh, Stanley dissects the extremely personal history she has with her body. As she puts back together the exposed, intimate parts of herself, Elise emphasises the tensions between her mind and body, operating in unison.

 

Artist Bios

 

David Lindesay is a film photographer and multimedia artist. He graduated with First Class Honours from the Australian National University School of Art & Design in 2018. Since leaving university, he has exhibited in Canberra, Melbourne and Sydney in several group and solo exhibitions. Lindesay works as an Installer at the National Gallery of Australia, as well as maintaining his professional and personal photographic practises. This personal work has lately explored ideas of self portraiture through the agency of touch, and more broadly, representations of the body as power and group identity.

 

Elise Stanley is a print-bases artist located in Canberra, Australia. Elise recently completed her Bachelor of Visual Arts (Honours) in Printmedia & Drawing at the Australian National University School of Art & Design. Stanley has exhibited nationally and locally and upon graduating was the recipient of multiple awards as part of the Emerging Artist Award Scheme. Within her practice, Stanley references her own fleshy, fat figure, across several drawing and printmaking techniques. By depicting honest projections of herself, both emotionally and physically, Elise describes her personal experiences of femininity, vulnerability and autonomy, particularly focusing on the ways they operate cohesively, rather than in opposition.

FEATURED WORKS

David Lindesay, Corrupted Touch (1), 2020, Polaroid Film, 8 x 8 cm
David Lindesay, Corrupted Touch (2), 2020, Polaroid Film, 8 x 8 cm
David Lindesay, Corrupted Touch (3), 2020, Polaroid Film, 8 x 8 cm
Elise Stanley, Vulnerable Tendencies, 2019
Elise Stanley, Vulnerable Tendencies (detail 1), 2019
Elise Stanley, Vulnerable Tendencies (detail 3), 2019

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS