Ephemeral Inscriptions

Chris Casali, Chloe Gunn & Jody Graham
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
November
   
24
 -  
December
   
5
Ephemeral Inscriptions asks its artists and their viewing audience to move beyond the surface quality of the presented façade in an attempt to explore the presence and interpretation of touch, gesture and trace.

INFORMATION

Typically an inscription is made by a motion of the hand that leaves behind a record of its trajectory. Ephemerality removes this sense of permanence via the ‘culture of speed’ we appear to be closely aligned to (Tomlinson, 2007).

Ephemeral Inscriptions asks its artists and their viewing audience to move beyond the surface quality of the presented façade in an attempt to explore the presence and interpretation of touch, gesture and trace.

Slow your heart and open your eyes …

Tomlinson, J. (2007). The culture of speed: The coming of immediacy. London, England: Sage.

Typically an inscription is made by a motion of the hand that leaves behind a record of its trajectory. Ephemerality removes this sense of permanence via the ‘culture of speed’ we appear to be closely aligned to (Tomlinson, 2007).

Ephemeral Inscriptions asks its artists and their viewing audience to move beyond the surface quality of the presented façade in an attempt to explore the presence and interpretation of touch, gesture and trace.

Slow your heart and open your eyes …

Tomlinson, J. (2007). The culture of speed: The coming of immediacy. London, England: Sage.

FEATURED  WORKS

‍Chloe Gunn, 2016, Translucent Trajectories 2, ink on tracing paper, 35 x 45.7 cm
‍Chris Casali, 2016, Ignis Fatuus, graphite watercolour & pencil on clayboard, 28 x 35.5 cm
‍Jody Graham, 2016, Bamboozled, charcoal on paper, 29 x 21 cm

Chloe’s practise is underpinned by a relentless fascination with the human form, reverting to figurative imagery to anchor her rapid and intuitive marks. Her works are also informed by her avid interest in life drawing, both in the sense of working within this medium and in contemplating the act as a discipline of observation.

Chris Casali’s current practice attempts to strip back external influences on her identity and practice as an artist. This process of making is one of reduction and withdrawal: an active removal of oneself from the external to the internal world.

Jody Graham engages in continuous writing in an attempt to access subconscious thinking as well as exploring the calligraphic mark. Fragments of thoughts and conversations are the starting point for partial automatism which is essentially seeking a deeper understanding of stirring memories and encounters. In these text based drawings Graham is pursuing the pictorial equivalent of subliminal thinking.

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