Good night

Chuanxu Wang, Jennifer Murray, Lynn Pavey, Neha Gupte, Rob MaxWell, Suzanne Claridge, Tom Malek, Zorica Purlija
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
February
   
6
 -  
February
   
17
Transmitting love through screens and devices distorts and gaslights reality, as solitude, loneliness and unattainability is comforted by dwindling hope. How long can you hold on?

INFORMATION

Good night is an ordinary bedtime routine as an ending of the conversation online or offline. It might be one of the most tranquil regards on behalf of someone who loves and cares about you. Furthermore, it links to more subtle subjects within long-distant relationships in contemporary society.

The phrase “good night” has many interpretations which can avert to both positive and negative repercussions of mental health. Ideally, ‘good night’ is not only a romantic farewell to some old time but also a cordial welcome to another reborn life, both for you and your beloved. But in real life, it might be a sort of mayday from the bottom of a single lonely heart, a self-hypnotism by a sleepless soul.  

The multiple meanings of ‘good night’ explained by eight artists were embodied in this exhibition.  No matter if it is the punctuation of day to night, or a manipulating switch from an insomniac to a leaden slumber, we cannot tell. Sometimes, you are not the one who can determine whether you have a ‘good’ night or sleep. Insomniacs regard medicine as night. People living in the Arctic Circle regard day as night. The metropolitans regard early morning as night.

Some bodies sleep in peace as some souls scream in depression.


Good night is an ordinary bedtime routine as an ending of the conversation online or offline. It might be one of the most tranquil regards on behalf of someone who loves and cares about you. Furthermore, it links to more subtle subjects within long-distant relationships in contemporary society.

The phrase “good night” has many interpretations which can avert to both positive and negative repercussions of mental health. Ideally, ‘good night’ is not only a romantic farewell to some old time but also a cordial welcome to another reborn life, both for you and your beloved. But in real life, it might be a sort of mayday from the bottom of a single lonely heart, a self-hypnotism by a sleepless soul.  

The multiple meanings of ‘good night’ explained by eight artists were embodied in this exhibition.  No matter if it is the punctuation of day to night, or a manipulating switch from an insomniac to a leaden slumber, we cannot tell. Sometimes, you are not the one who can determine whether you have a ‘good’ night or sleep. Insomniacs regard medicine as night. People living in the Arctic Circle regard day as night. The metropolitans regard early morning as night.

Some bodies sleep in peace as some souls scream in depression.


FEATURED  WORKS

Chuanxu Wang, Peninsula, 2019, inkjet print, 40 x 60 cm

Tom Malek, Untitled Portrait #1, 2017, Silver Gelatine Print, 37 x 27 cm

  Rob MaxWell, Mirtazapine, 2019,  Watercolour & ink on paper, 15 x 10 cm

Rob MaxWell, Alprazolam, 2019,  Watercolour & ink on paper, 15 x 10 cm

 Rob MaxWell, Diazepam, 2019,  Watercolour & ink on paper, 15 x 10 cm

Suzanne Claridge, Blue, 2019, oil on canvas, 55 x 55 cm

Suzanne Claridge, Yellow, 2019, oil on canvas, 55 x 55 cm

Neha Gupte, Naptime, 2019, Mixed Media, 29.7 x 21 cm 

Neha Gupte, Sleeping Beauty, 2019, Mixed Media, 21 x 14.8 cm

Lynn Pavey, Resting Places, paper news print ‘Traveller Section’, wax, feathers, wire, found objects, 29 x 50 cm

Jennifer Murray, Arctic Walk. (Icelandic Winter Pattern Series), 2015, Acrylic on Lanaquarelle Paper,
      19 x 21 cm

Jennifer Murray, Harpa (Icelandic Winter Pattern Series), 2015, Acrylic on Lanaquarelle Paper,
      19 x 21 cm  

Jennifer Murray, Marina 4. (Icelandic Winter Pattern Series), 2015, Acrylic on Lanaquarelle Paper, 19 x 21 cm

Zorica Purlija, Smoke and Haze #3, 2010, Ilford Gallerie Photo Paper, 60 x 60 cm

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS