HEAD ON PHOTO FESTIVAL: If mothers were flowers I'd pick you

Uma Manasseh
   
November
   
12
 -  
November
   
23
Memories, materialistic and self-absorbed ideals faded, we asked what links us to the world? How does the fragmentation of thought and physical disintegration affect one’s relationship with self and world, freedom and dependence?

INFORMATION

My work rawly portrays the last phase of life, centring around my bedridden grandmother, trapped within the fractured mind of dementia. Loss, isolation and the disjointed nature of oneself is focal for most, when observing this stage. I do not believe we should shy away from these experiences, rather, explore the complex dualities of life and death expressed in the essence of the dissolving self. This was confronting for me at 17 and brought forth many questions.

Memories, materialistic and self-absorbed ideals faded, we asked what links us to the world? How does the fragmentation of thought and physical disintegration affect one’s relationship with self and world, freedom and dependence? Aging is something many fear, yet as a universal human experience I believe it needs to be accepted, faced with dignity and compassion.

The importance of human connection is emphasized. Vivid through hallowed cries for loved ones, expressions and grasping hands, this yearning for connection imbues every element of fading life. The sound recordings illuminate questions of sanity, and the fears of losing what once was taken for granted. The isolation, sheer confusion and disjointed nature of oneself during life's final chapter is symbolised by the elements and objects of environment embodied in their stark reality. This is a time of both terror and beauty. The use of unstaged photography and sound recordings enabled me to portray a raw reality as close to experienced. By incorporating other people from the home it was my hope to reiterate the universal nature of this subject matter and its importance.

My work rawly portrays the last phase of life, centring around my bedridden grandmother, trapped within the fractured mind of dementia. Loss, isolation and the disjointed nature of oneself is focal for most, when observing this stage. I do not believe we should shy away from these experiences, rather, explore the complex dualities of life and death expressed in the essence of the dissolving self. This was confronting for me at 17 and brought forth many questions.

Memories, materialistic and self-absorbed ideals faded, we asked what links us to the world? How does the fragmentation of thought and physical disintegration affect one’s relationship with self and world, freedom and dependence? Aging is something many fear, yet as a universal human experience I believe it needs to be accepted, faced with dignity and compassion.

The importance of human connection is emphasized. Vivid through hallowed cries for loved ones, expressions and grasping hands, this yearning for connection imbues every element of fading life. The sound recordings illuminate questions of sanity, and the fears of losing what once was taken for granted. The isolation, sheer confusion and disjointed nature of oneself during life's final chapter is symbolised by the elements and objects of environment embodied in their stark reality. This is a time of both terror and beauty. The use of unstaged photography and sound recordings enabled me to portray a raw reality as close to experienced. By incorporating other people from the home it was my hope to reiterate the universal nature of this subject matter and its importance.

FEATURED WORKS

Uma Manasseh, asleep or awake, 2019, photography
Uma Manasseh, observing time pass, 2019, photography
Uma Manasseh, to have and to hold, 2019, photography
Uma Manasseh, fragmented thoughts, 2019, photography
Uma Manasseh, the waiting, 2019, photography
Uma Manasseh, Grandma’s grasping hands, 2019, photography

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS