Inheritance

Liz Bradshaw
   
November
   
12
 -  
November
   
23
"The sculptures serve as memorial gesture as well as provocation: an attempt to visualise– and articulate – the reverberations of destruction through cultural forms."

INFORMATION

This body of work is a series of sculptural experiments with found objects, industrial detritus and building materials that reflect on our over-consumption and exploitation of natural resources; our relentless impact on our environment; and what drives this destructive excess.

 

It is a material attempt to come to terms with the emotional and cognitive dissonance brought about by our consumption culture, and its inescapable commodification of all experience. Taking from minimalism the critique of interiority inherent in body-scaled work, it asks questions of the viewer in the face of the parallel impossibilities of unmediated intimate experiences of both the natural world and our sense of self, especially in the context of incomprehensible but intuitable systemic collapse of our world. It sits as a meditation on alienation and identity.

 

There is inherent a broader inquiry being made with reference to Australian expressions of masculinity and ownership of the land, exploring ideas about nature, the body and subjectivity through a proprioceptive experience of manipulated cultural signposts: for industrial production; for objects of consumption; and for ideas of self.

 

The sculptures serve as memorial gesture as well as provocation: an attempt to visualise– and articulate – the reverberations of destruction through cultural forms.

 

 ARTIST BIO

Dr Liz Bradshaw is an artist and cultural researcher. Her work is about the historical and epistemological archives of industrialisation and modernity, and the ideas, processes and artefacts of these histories as they resurface in contemporary culture transformed by technology and globalisation. Her practice explores the ways these histories and praxes produce marginalisation, and resist, silence or accommodate the voices of others.

She has exhibited site-specific work, sculpture, installation, drawing and photography internationally; in galleries, libraries, archives and other historical sites, and published on art and design, and creative education. She has developed collaborative projects in interactive technology, and taught art and design in Sydney and the UK.

This body of work is a series of sculptural experiments with found objects, industrial detritus and building materials that reflect on our over-consumption and exploitation of natural resources; our relentless impact on our environment; and what drives this destructive excess.

 

It is a material attempt to come to terms with the emotional and cognitive dissonance brought about by our consumption culture, and its inescapable commodification of all experience. Taking from minimalism the critique of interiority inherent in body-scaled work, it asks questions of the viewer in the face of the parallel impossibilities of unmediated intimate experiences of both the natural world and our sense of self, especially in the context of incomprehensible but intuitable systemic collapse of our world. It sits as a meditation on alienation and identity.

 

There is inherent a broader inquiry being made with reference to Australian expressions of masculinity and ownership of the land, exploring ideas about nature, the body and subjectivity through a proprioceptive experience of manipulated cultural signposts: for industrial production; for objects of consumption; and for ideas of self.

 

The sculptures serve as memorial gesture as well as provocation: an attempt to visualise– and articulate – the reverberations of destruction through cultural forms.

 

 ARTIST BIO

Dr Liz Bradshaw is an artist and cultural researcher. Her work is about the historical and epistemological archives of industrialisation and modernity, and the ideas, processes and artefacts of these histories as they resurface in contemporary culture transformed by technology and globalisation. Her practice explores the ways these histories and praxes produce marginalisation, and resist, silence or accommodate the voices of others.

She has exhibited site-specific work, sculpture, installation, drawing and photography internationally; in galleries, libraries, archives and other historical sites, and published on art and design, and creative education. She has developed collaborative projects in interactive technology, and taught art and design in Sydney and the UK.

FEATURED WORKS

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS