Intermix

Rabia Khan, Yuheng Fu, Ruolan Yang, Qiulin Li & Aurora Li
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
August
   
15
 -  
August
   
26
Intermix is an exhibition by five University of New South Wales, Art and Design students who have come together to put up a show to exhibit their final year thesis. They all work with different mediums and concepts showcasing distinct ideas and notions.

INFORMATION

Rabia Khan

My work stems from an emotional roller coaster of all different kinds of feelings that originated when I went through a traumatic experience of sexual abuse as a child. The work is a series of clothes dipped in clay slip, varying in different sizes, depicting cloths as a protective layer for my body that I feel is on display all the time. The display of the artwork is as close as possible to the natural process of someone taking their clothes off and either hanging them or leaving them on the floor. The feeling of presence of the body in those clothes, without the body actually being there, is what I want to recreate in my work and my audience to feel when they enter the space.

Yuheng Fu

One of the biggest issues we face today is protecting the wildlife. Though, we believe putting animals in a safe and guarded space is protecting them but the irony is we buy tickets to see wild animals in a zoo. We fail to acknowledge at that point in time that they are no longer living in their natural habitat, they are not free, they are not in the wild. We always put what we think is right first and end up ignoring the basics. Animals should live in the wild because that is their origin, just like human lives with each other in a house. I am going to talk about how self-centered human nature is and how we control wildlife with our will, to create this “Utopia” and are slowly destroying original states.

Ruolan Yang

My work explores human emotions. Over this year, I have experienced many different feelings due to the distance between myself and home. For example, I feel worried about how to deal with the relationship with my boyfriend, the wedding of my best friends moved me,my grandparents have suffered a serious disease that scared me. All of these experiences make me curious about different people’s experiences,finally these series of photos could be my another new work about identities. I chose the form of participatory art which involves listening to people’s stories and every pair of photos consists of both person and object, while the object is the symbol of every emotion. I will not tell the audience the emotion behind every photo, it is better that audience feels the emotion themselves. The pictures may appear abstract but all of them will be printed and hung on the wall so that the audience can experience these emotions and compare that with their own feelings and experiences.


Qiulin Li

Woolloomooloo is a harbour side inner city suburb in Sydney NSW. It is famous for Finger Wharf, an old cargo dock that attracts a trendy clientele with fine dining, hip bars and water views on all sides. However, this is not entirely what it is. Apart from the stylish aspect, it’s known for the high density of public housing and Sydney’s the most successful homeless shelter — Matthew Talbot Hostel. In Aboriginal language Woolloomooloo means a young black kangaroo. It is not common to see such distinct differences coexist in this weirdly harmony. One side of the road is middle class’s go-to, place of songs and dances, while the other side is quiet, mussy and filling with low-incomer’s houses. There seems to have an invisible wall segregating people apart in Woolloomooloo. A Young Black Kangaroo depicted the lives in Woolloomooloo from the inside of Woolloomoolooer’s backyard to their street, from the life story to their prospective. Revealed people’s delight and sadness, struggle and desire.

Aurora Li

The ceremony is the reality and belief of a faithful heart. This faith is something that we regard as the highest belief. It is the stars of Oscar Wilde and moon of Gauguin. It is what Aurora Li would like to reflected on in this project with a radical while substantial way to unpack the other traces in life. The movement, it is a symbol of life, a justification for our prosperity, a battery which refueled us each single day. Objects, it has surpassed the boundary of their original intentions or functions. It has been repeated countlessly and expertized by the masters and finally developed into a style on which the mechanism of applying the necessary tools has to depend. Take another look on the relationship between the objects and the masters. The beauty of the objects embodied at the value of being used, the more they are used, and the more beauty will be added on them. There is a natural affinity between the objects and the masters. The ceremony sealed the time and beauty in a way that hooking the audiences and leads the latter to a temporary flow. “But the merit of these works certainly lies elsewhere than in their ‘meaning’.” Susan Song tag once stated. Aurora Li explored the mysterious bizarre of the subject, the liaison or the contrast between different elements,mutant self. This is a new way of looking, refusing to be bound by convention,expectation or politeness.


Rabia Khan

My work stems from an emotional roller coaster of all different kinds of feelings that originated when I went through a traumatic experience of sexual abuse as a child. The work is a series of clothes dipped in clay slip, varying in different sizes, depicting cloths as a protective layer for my body that I feel is on display all the time. The display of the artwork is as close as possible to the natural process of someone taking their clothes off and either hanging them or leaving them on the floor. The feeling of presence of the body in those clothes, without the body actually being there, is what I want to recreate in my work and my audience to feel when they enter the space.

Yuheng Fu

One of the biggest issues we face today is protecting the wildlife. Though, we believe putting animals in a safe and guarded space is protecting them but the irony is we buy tickets to see wild animals in a zoo. We fail to acknowledge at that point in time that they are no longer living in their natural habitat, they are not free, they are not in the wild. We always put what we think is right first and end up ignoring the basics. Animals should live in the wild because that is their origin, just like human lives with each other in a house. I am going to talk about how self-centered human nature is and how we control wildlife with our will, to create this “Utopia” and are slowly destroying original states.

Ruolan Yang

My work explores human emotions. Over this year, I have experienced many different feelings due to the distance between myself and home. For example, I feel worried about how to deal with the relationship with my boyfriend, the wedding of my best friends moved me,my grandparents have suffered a serious disease that scared me. All of these experiences make me curious about different people’s experiences,finally these series of photos could be my another new work about identities. I chose the form of participatory art which involves listening to people’s stories and every pair of photos consists of both person and object, while the object is the symbol of every emotion. I will not tell the audience the emotion behind every photo, it is better that audience feels the emotion themselves. The pictures may appear abstract but all of them will be printed and hung on the wall so that the audience can experience these emotions and compare that with their own feelings and experiences.


Qiulin Li

Woolloomooloo is a harbour side inner city suburb in Sydney NSW. It is famous for Finger Wharf, an old cargo dock that attracts a trendy clientele with fine dining, hip bars and water views on all sides. However, this is not entirely what it is. Apart from the stylish aspect, it’s known for the high density of public housing and Sydney’s the most successful homeless shelter — Matthew Talbot Hostel. In Aboriginal language Woolloomooloo means a young black kangaroo. It is not common to see such distinct differences coexist in this weirdly harmony. One side of the road is middle class’s go-to, place of songs and dances, while the other side is quiet, mussy and filling with low-incomer’s houses. There seems to have an invisible wall segregating people apart in Woolloomooloo. A Young Black Kangaroo depicted the lives in Woolloomooloo from the inside of Woolloomoolooer’s backyard to their street, from the life story to their prospective. Revealed people’s delight and sadness, struggle and desire.

Aurora Li

The ceremony is the reality and belief of a faithful heart. This faith is something that we regard as the highest belief. It is the stars of Oscar Wilde and moon of Gauguin. It is what Aurora Li would like to reflected on in this project with a radical while substantial way to unpack the other traces in life. The movement, it is a symbol of life, a justification for our prosperity, a battery which refueled us each single day. Objects, it has surpassed the boundary of their original intentions or functions. It has been repeated countlessly and expertized by the masters and finally developed into a style on which the mechanism of applying the necessary tools has to depend. Take another look on the relationship between the objects and the masters. The beauty of the objects embodied at the value of being used, the more they are used, and the more beauty will be added on them. There is a natural affinity between the objects and the masters. The ceremony sealed the time and beauty in a way that hooking the audiences and leads the latter to a temporary flow. “But the merit of these works certainly lies elsewhere than in their ‘meaning’.” Susan Song tag once stated. Aurora Li explored the mysterious bizarre of the subject, the liaison or the contrast between different elements,mutant self. This is a new way of looking, refusing to be bound by convention,expectation or politeness.


FEATURED  WORKS

Rabia Khan, body on display, slip dipped cloth, 95 x 38 cm
Qiulin Li, Window with pigeons, Archival print on fine art paper, 21 x 29.7 cm
Yuheng Fu, The Stage, 2019, Mixed media on paper, 50 x 50 cm

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS