Through the Eyes of a Colour Blind Artist

Elias Baydoun
EXHIBITION  RUNS
   
July
   
4
 -  
July
   
15
The use of colour has always played a significant role in Mexican life. Mexican culture bursts with colour found in architecture, cuisine, flamboyant textiles and vivid folk art.

INFORMATION

Through the Eyes of a Colour Blind Artist is a body of work that explores colour and texture in multi-layered compositions where one colour can become a different colour through layers of contrasting shades and tone.

The Mexican born artist has been influenced and exposed to the vibrancy of colour found throughout Mexican culture and society. The use of colour has always played a significant role in Mexican life. Mexican culture bursts with colour found in architecture, cuisine, flamboyant textiles and vivid folk art.

The artist has applied this strong influence to his work based around the sights and colours of the Inner West of Sydney where he has lived for most of his adult life.


I was born in Mexico City but migrated to Sydney with my family when I was a young teenager.

I am a self-taught artist and have been constantly influenced by the worship of colour throughout Mexican culture and have tried to apply it to my view of life in Sydney.

My love of colour and the fact I am colourblind make a very unique juxtaposition.

I like to match, contrast and layer colours in different ways trying to challenge not only my colour blindness but that of the viewer of my art.

Most of us share a common colour vision sensory experience. However, in my case, my perception of colour is different from what people see.

I have Red-Green colour blindness (Denternomaly). I find it difficult to tell purple from blue, orange from green or dark green from brown, as well as pink from grey.

Through the Eyes of a Colour Blind Artist is a body of work that explores colour and texture in multi-layered compositions where one colour can become a different colour through layers of contrasting shades and tone.

The Mexican born artist has been influenced and exposed to the vibrancy of colour found throughout Mexican culture and society. The use of colour has always played a significant role in Mexican life. Mexican culture bursts with colour found in architecture, cuisine, flamboyant textiles and vivid folk art.

The artist has applied this strong influence to his work based around the sights and colours of the Inner West of Sydney where he has lived for most of his adult life.


I was born in Mexico City but migrated to Sydney with my family when I was a young teenager.

I am a self-taught artist and have been constantly influenced by the worship of colour throughout Mexican culture and have tried to apply it to my view of life in Sydney.

My love of colour and the fact I am colourblind make a very unique juxtaposition.

I like to match, contrast and layer colours in different ways trying to challenge not only my colour blindness but that of the viewer of my art.

Most of us share a common colour vision sensory experience. However, in my case, my perception of colour is different from what people see.

I have Red-Green colour blindness (Denternomaly). I find it difficult to tell purple from blue, orange from green or dark green from brown, as well as pink from grey.

FEATURED  WORKS

Elias Baydoun, Autumn Mind, 2018, Acrylic on Canvas, 91.5 x 152.5 cm
Elias Baydoun, Blue Pond, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 101.5 x 152.5 cm
Elias Baydoun, From Sydney To Kanagawa, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 101.5 x 152.5cm
Elias Baydoun, Inner West Purple, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 91.5 cm
Elias Baydoun, Inner West Village, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 101 x 101 cm
Elias Baydoun, Marrickville Waratah, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 101.5 x 121.5 cm
Elias Baydoun, Urban Blue, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 152.5 cm
Elias Baydoun, Urban Night, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 152.5 cm
Elias Baydoun, Water Lilies, 2018,Acrylic on canvas, 101.5 x 121.5 cm
Elias Baydoun, Autumn Leaves, 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 152.5 cm

OTHER  EXHIBITIONS